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Registrations open for the AIRAH Building Simulation Workshop (20/12/12)

 

AIRAH – supported by IBPSA (The International Building Performance Simulation Association) – is hosting the AIRAH Building Simulation Workshop in Melbourne on April 18 next year.

Registrations for the Workshop have opened.

“The focus of the Workshop is to educate and debate the issues, creating an exciting and informative forum that is intended to advance the status and quality of the industry’s use of simulation,” says AIRAH chief operating officer Neil Cox.

AIRAH Building Simulation Workshop committee chair Paul Bannister, M.AIRAH, says a lack of skills among professionals is what’s holding the discipline of building simulation back, and is driving the need for such an initiative.

“The use of computer simulation of building performance has become embedded in many of the industry’s standard processes, including the BCA, NABERS and Green Star, and yet for many this has been a recent development,” Bannister says.

“As a result there are significant skills gaps in the industry that lead to sub-optimal – and sometimes substandard – work being produced. This Workshop is intended for dynamic thermal simulation users and their managers, and will cover many of the key questions facing the industry and how it uses simulation.”

Issues to be canvassed at the Workshop include:

  • Harmonisation of the BCA, NABERS and Green Star requirements
  • Improved accuracy in the modelling of key HVAC elements including chillers, boilers cooling towers, pumps and fans
  • Quality control
  • The role of simulation in ESD consulting
  • Simulation, calibration, measurement and verification
  • Accreditation, teaching and quality assurance.

 

For registrations or more information, go to www.airah.org.au/BuildingSimulationWorkshop2013

Conference sponsor: DesignBuilder.

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AIRAH's Refrigeration 2013 conference calls for abstracts (7/12/2012)

 

AIRAH has chosen Tasmania to host the third of its annual conferences dedicated to refrigeration. Refrigeration 2013 – embracing the challenges and opportunities will take place in Hobart on Friday May 10. Abstracts are now welcome.


AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH, says the conference is a logical follow-up to the first two AIRAH dedicated refrigeration conferences – held in Melbourne in 2011 and Brisbane this year – which proved to be enormously popular and successful.


“AIRAH’s Refrigeration 2012 conference proved there is an absolute need for gatherings of this kind, so that information can be disseminated, stories shared and members from across the industry gather. AIRAH is proud to host the next in this essential conference series.”


Conference committee chair Stefan Jensen, F.AIRAH, says the conference theme of “Embracing the challenges and opportunities” reflects the need to deal with refrigeration issues post the imposition of the carbon-equivalent levy.


“Refrigeration 2013 – embracing the challenges and opportunities will deal with refrigeration issues in the age of the carbon levy,” Jensen says. “There are many topics that need to be fleshed out in detail, and the conference will provide the opportunity to do this.”


AIRAH is calling for 300–400 word abstracts. Topics and case studies may include, but are not limited to:

  • Accreditation/education/standards/training
  • Insurance and the levy
  • How to beat the levy
  • Environmental lifecycle costing
  • Industry licensing, compliance and enforcement
  • Secondary refrigerants applications
  • System design and balancing
  • Real-life case studies.

 

Abstracts are due February 22. All submissions must be sent with a 50–100 word author bio and high-resolution author photo.


Who should submit an abstract?

  • Refrigeration consultants
  • Refrigeration software designers/suppliers
  • Refrigeration equipment suppliers
  • Representatives of associations or organisations that use refrigeration services
  • Universities and other learning institutions
  • Electronics engineers and SCADA system developers specialising in refrigeration
  • Climate scientists
  • Commissioning specialists including vibration analysts.

Delegates chosen to present at Refrigeration 2013 – embracing the challenges and opportunities are also required to submit a technical paper before the conference.

AIRAH members chosen to present at the conference will receive complimentary registration.


Non-AIRAH members chosen to present at the conference will be entitled to a discounted conference registration fee.
 

Abstract submissions can be sent to conference organiser Kristy Intamanon at kristy@airah.org.au


More information about the conference is available from www.airah.org.au/refrigeration2013

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AIRAH's Melbourne Pre-loved Buildings conference a grand success (28/11/2012)

 

Held recently in Melbourne, the latest in AIRAH’s successful Pre-loved Buildings conference series drew together industry professionals bound by their interest in optimising the existing building stock.


The conference was held at Melbourne’s iconic MCG; it drew more than 150 delegates, including HVAC design engineers and consultants, building operators, RMIT University students, facility managers, mechanical services contractors, and maintenance personnel.


AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH, says the conference clearly struck a chord with those keen to get the most out of the “pre-loved” building stock.


“The Pre-loved Buildings conference underscores that a strong focus on HVAC&R in the existing built environment can achieve transformative effects when it comes to reducing energy use, conserving water and improving the occupied space,” Wilkinson says.


“What was also clear was the strong impact NABERS has had in this space, and the importance of the Green Building Fund’s continuing support for the industry.”


The conference opening address, “Energy efficiency is the new black” was delivered by Parliamentary Secretary for Climate Change and Energy Efficiency Mark Dreyfus.


“Backed by the government’s Clean Energy Future plan and a property market that is embracing energy efficiency, your industry is at the forefront of a very big and very long-term change that will improve living standards of all Australians,” Dreyfus told delegates.


Greg Hunt, Shadow Minister for Climate Action, Environment and Heritage, delivered the keynote address of the conference’s second day: “Clean energy without the carbon tax”.

Conference committee chair Bruce Precious, M.AIRAH, says the conference highlight for him was the positive news shared by delegates about their projects.


“So many papers spoke of the experience of bringing poor-performing buildings up to high – 4-plus NABERS Energy – standards,” Precious says. “The market is well and truly transforming for higher energy performance.”

Precious says he’d like delegates to have left AIRAH’s Pre-loved Buildings conference with the understanding that climate change and the resulting requirement for energy efficiency do not make existing buildings redundant.


“Improving energy efficiency saves owners and tenants money, and is often a strategy to improve indoor environments,” Precious says. “The HVAC industry has a significant role to play in continued innovation. AIRAH must continue to lead the way.”


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2012 AIRAH Awards winners announced (16/11/2012)

 

 

AIRAH has recognised outstanding achievements in the HVAC&R industry at the 2012 AIRAH Awards presentation dinner, held recently in Brisbane.


The awards focus on acknowledging and celebrating professional excellence in HVAC&R, and in doing so, help lift standards for the entire industry.

“The AIRAH Awards are an important part of our organisation’s activities,” says AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson. “By acknowledging achievement among our membership, we raise the bar for the HVAC&R industry and beyond.”


The AIRAH Awards 2012 winners are:

  • Student of the Year: Ramadas Narayanan, Affil.AIRAH

  • Future Leader: Jessica Holz, M.AIRAH – Umow Lai Engineering

  • Excellence in Innovation: Air Change – Air Change Dehumidification Unit

  • Excellence in Sustainability: NDY – Melbourne Water Data Centre

  • Best HVAC and Refrigeration Retrofit or Upgrade: GHD – 4 Mort Street, Canberra

  • Excellence in HVAC and Refrigeration Research: Dr Frank Bruno, Affil.AIRAH, Dr Martin Belusko and Steven Tay, University of SA – High-performing low-cost thermal storage with phase-change materials.

  • WR Ahern award for the best technical paper by an AIRAH member published in Ecolibrium: Dr Weng Poh, M.AIRAH, for his paper “Tenability criteria for design of smoke hazard management systems”, which was published in the August 2011 issue of Ecolibrium.

  • Denis Joseph Award for Innovative Use of Solar Energy in HVAC and Refrigeration: CSIRO – TAFE NSW Hunter Institute – Two-rotor solar desiccant air conditioning system

 

 

This year the AIRAH Award categories and nomination criteria were tweaked in order to simplify the entry procedure; the improvements led to a record number of entries.


“The success of this year’s AIRAH Awards really starts with one thing: those who took the time to nominate their colleagues and recognise the excellence of particular projects,” says AIRAH chief operating officer Neil Cox. “The calibre and number of nominations this year was unsurpassed.”

 

Air Change Australia and NABERS were individual Award sponsors.


“The AIRAH Awards offer a great way to celebrate industry best practice and to share knowledge,” Wilkinson says. “I encourage those who have been working on projects of excellence to consider nominating for the AIRAH Awards 2013.” 

 

For more information and photos of the night, click here.

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AIRAH and Standards Australia to co-host AS 1668 seminars (19/10/2012)

 

Due to a recent revision, Australian Standard 1668 – The use of ventilation and air conditioning in buildings has been split into two separate standards: AS 1668.2 – Mechanical ventilation of buildings and AS 1668.4 – Natural ventilation of buildings.

“Standards Australia's committees have worked long and hard to get this standard done. We are very pleased to have the AS 1668.2 document ready for consideration for BCA referencing in 2013,” says Adam Stingemore, Standards Australia National Sector Manager, Building, Construction and Plumbing.


AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH, says that In light of the changes, AIRAH and Standards Australia are presenting a national seminar series covering the new standard.


“The motivation for the new standard is about removing confusion of having two available versions of the ventilation standard; the idea is to have one definitive standard on mechanical ventilation for reference in the National Construction Code,” Wilkinson says.


“Since there is uncertainty out there about the new standard’s impact, we felt it prudent to run a nationwide seminar series addressing issues and questions that might arise.”


Key changes to the new standards include simplification of the methods for selection of minimum outdoor air; energy-efficiency options across the documents; changes to the classifications of exhausts; improved provisions regarding odour control of exhaust discharge; review of ventilation rates for car parks; and Part 4 – new standard covering natural ventilation.


Wilkinson says the seminars will provide invaluable information for mechanical services designers, maintenance contractors, building surveyors, building owners, facilities managers, regulatory authorities, and equipment manufacturers and suppliers.


The seminars are presented by Simon Hill, L.AIRAH, who represents AIRAH on Standards Australia’s Ventilation and Air Conditioning Committee ME-062.



Seminar dates and locations:
Sydney – November 26
Canberra – November 27
Melbourne – November 28
Hobart – November 29
Brisbane – December 3
Darwin – December 4
Adelaide – December 10
Perth – December 11


For more information, go to the Seminars page

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Finalists named for the AIRAH Awards 2012 (18/10/2012) 

   

Recognising outstanding achievements during 2010/2011, the annual AIRAH Awards are the HVAC&R industry's most prestigious accolades.


Awards will be presented on November 8 at a national awards presentation dinner at Moda Events Portside, Brisbane.


“The AIRAH Awards are an important part of our organisation’s activities,” says AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH. “By acknowledging achievement among our membership, we raise the bar for the HVAC&R industry and beyond.


“This year we tweaked the award categories and nomination criteria to simplify the entry procedure while maintaining the highest of standards.


“And we had a fantastic response. I know the judges had a tough time winnowing out the various categories. I look forward to meeting all the finalists in Brisbane.”


 
2012 AIRAH Awards finalists


Future Leader
Dhvanit Shah, App.AIRAH; Jessica Holz, M.AIRAH; Rob Simic, M.AIRAH.

Student of the Year
Ramadas Narayanan, Affil.AIRAH; Sonia Holzheimer, M.AIRAH.
 
Excellence in Innovation
Air Change – ACDHUM: Air Change dehumidification unit; ebm-papst – ebm-papst EC RadiCal centrifugal fan series; Innotech – ATOM software application; Ziehl-Abegg – ZA Plus; Actron Air – Tri-Capacity.
 
Excellence in Sustainability
AG Coombs – HVAC energy optimisation project: 100 Pacific Highway, North Sydney; Arup – MLC Centre GPT workplace project; NDY – Melbourne Water Data Centre; ebm-papst – Energy-saving fans (ESM) made from biomaterial; Realcold – Gold Coast Stadium.
 
Best HVAC or Refrigeration Retrofit or Upgrade
Scantec – Logan City Council; Scantec – Castlemaine Perkins (XXXX) Brewery;
GHD – 4 Mort Street, Canberra.
 
Excellence in HVAC and Refrigeration Research
Dr Frank Bruno, Affil.AIRAH, Dr Martin Belusko and Mr Steven Tay, University of South Australia: High-performing low-cost thermal storage with phase-change materials; Dr Richard de Dear, University of Sydney: The Indoor Environmental Quality Laboratory (IEQ Lab).
 
Denis Joseph Award for Innovative Use of Solar Energy in HVAC and Refrigeration
CSIRO/TAFE NSW Hunter Institute – Two-rotor solar desiccant air conditioning system; The Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University – CoolSolar; Medland Metropolis – GCI Headquarters at the University of Queensland.

WR Ahern Award
The WR Ahern Award is presented to the best technical paper in Ecolibrium written by an AIRAH member.



2012 AIRAH Awards Presentation Dinner
When: 7pm, Thursday, November 8
Where: Moda Events Portside, Hamilton, Brisbane
Cost: $160, tables of 10: $1,500


For tickets email martine@airah.org.au

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Mark Dreyfus and Greg Hunt to address AIRAH's Pre-loved Buildings conference (6/9/2012)



Parliamentary Secretary for Climate Change and Energy Efficiency Mark Dreyfus, and Greg Hunt, Shadow Minister for Climate Action, Environment and Heritage, will be the keynote speakers at AIRAH’s Pre-loved Buildings conference.


To be held in Melbourne from November 19–20, the conference’s two-day program focuses on optimising the existing building stock.


Dreyfus will deliver the opening address for the conference, entitled, “Creating our clean energy future – jobs and innovation”.


Hunt will open the second day of the conference with his keynote address, “Update from the Shadow Minister for Climate Action, Environment and Heritage”.


The Melbourne 2012 Pre-loved Buildings Conference, tagged “Preparing buildings for the future”, is the sixth in a series of highly successful AIRAH conferences, with previous iterations also held in Sydney, Brisbane and Perth, as well as the Victorian capital.


AIRAH chief operating officer Neil Cox says that securing the attendance of Dreyfus and Hunt for the Pre-loved Buildings conference – Preparing buildings for the future is quite the coup for AIRAH.


“It speaks volumes about the aspirations of the conference, and the esteem with which AIRAH is regarded, that we’ve been able to secure the services of the sitting Parliamentary Secretary for Climate Change and Energy Efficiency and also the Shadow Minister for Climate Action, Environment and Heritage, to speak at AIRAH’s Pre-loved Buildings conference,” Cox says.


“We think Mark Dreyfus and Greg Hunt will deliver suitably engaging, appropriate and inspiring speeches to open each day of the conference.”


The conference’s two-day program will feature speakers on a broad range of topics, covering issues such as:

  • Relifing Australia’s heritage and history
  • Lessons learnt from improving the energy performance of existing buildings
  • Refurbishing a dual-duct building
  • Activity-based working
  • Precinct thermal energy
  • Energy and indoor environment quality upgrades
  • Retrofitting B, C and D Grade buildings
  • Preparing for a low-carbon future.


Conference committee chair Bruce Precious, M.AIRAH, says that updating the existing building stock in Australia is as important as the focus on new buildings.

 
“All the major cities in Australia have something in common: they see a cleaner, greener, more productive future,” Precious says. “Yet most of the buildings that make up these cities already exist. How will today’s buildings meet tomorrow’s needs? And how can we optimise their performance? These issues will be explored at the Pre-loved Buildings Conference.”


Early bird registrations for AIRAH’s Pre-loved Buildings conference – Preparing buildings for the future close October 19.

 
For more information and to register go to www.airah.org.au/Pre-loved2012

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AIRAH’s DA27 and DA28 Design Manuals called up in Green Star (30/8/2012)




The Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA) has recognised AIRAH’s DA27 and DA28 design application manuals in Green Star rating tools as appropriate standards for commissioning within the “Management” category credit criteria for Man-2 (all tools). The two must be used in unison.


DA27 Building Commissioning and DA 28 Building Management and Controls Systems were released last year, and recognised in a recent GBCA technical clarification.


The recognition of AIRAH’s DA27 and DA28 will be written into the next revision of the credit. In the meantime, the technical clarification means project teams can automatically use the manuals.


“The Green Building Council of Australia’s decision to recognise DA27 and DA28 in its Green Star ratings tools is fantastic acknowledgement of the work put into them by very dedicated committees, and to AIRAH,” says AIRAH chief operating officer Neil Cox.


“The decision means that Australian industry can work with processes and documents that they understand. The guidelines are clear, and there is no need for additional interpretation or regional context. References are to Australian law, Australian regulations, Australian Standards, Australian practices – and all in a language and vernacular that Australian industry can understand.”


DA27 aims to help define and standardise the commissioning process, outline the critical steps, and promote a common language for the various stakeholders.


DA28 is intended to bridge the skills gap between the controls industry, design engineers and building operators. It outlines a generic process for the design and implementation of controls systems, and includes specific detailed and technical information relating to controls systems for HVAC&R and related services.


“We are committed to ensuring Green Star tools are robust, relevant and easy to use, and our decision to recognise AIRAH’s application manuals reflects this,” says the GBCA’s executive director – Green Star, Andrew Aitken.


“We value our continued collaboration with AIRAH, and will continue to listen to industry feedback and make improvements to Green Star to ensure it reflects best-practice standards in the sustainable property and construction industry.”


At present the Green Star credit criteria for Man-2 (all tools) states that “commissioning can be performed in accordance with ASHRAE Guideline 1-1996 (for mechanical services only) and CIBSE Commissioning Codes for other services.”


In addition to the documents outlined in the credit, the following two application manuals are now recognised as an appropriate standard for commissioning within this credit:


  • AIRAH application manual DA 27 Building Commissioning – 2011. This guide provides a comprehensive and Australian guide to building commissioning, similar to CIBSE Commissioning Codes.
  • AIRAH application manual DA 28 Building Management and Control Systems (BMCS) – 2011. This guide provides a comprehensive and Australian guide to controls and building management and control systems.


Where the credit states “CIBSE Commissioning Codes”, the credit should now be read as stating “CIBSE Commissioning Codes or both AIRAH DA27 and DA28”.


Vince Aherne, M.AIRAH, who edited DA27 and DA28, says the guides facilitate the essential process of building commissioning.


“Building commissioning is fundamentally important for a number of reasons, not least of which is that it directly affects a building’s sustainability and environmental footprint,” Aherne says.


“However, the building commissioning process and practice is often challenged due to time and financial constraints, particularly on a building running over schedule or over budget.


“The AIRAH guides outline a best-practice approach to building commissioning. They explain the process and the challenges, as well as the costs and benefits. Once these fundamentals are understood and agreed by all stakeholders at the beginning of a building project, the commissioning process, as outlined in DA27 and DA28, is much more likely to be followed and to be successful.”


The Design Application (DA) series of 18 publications produced by AIRAH are best-practice guidelines to assist HVAC&R practitioners with their day-to-day tasks in design, operation and maintenance of mechanical building services.


The series is available for purchase in the AIRAH online store.

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AIRAH releases carbon-equivalent levy fact sheets (27/8/2012)

 

 

The Australian Institute of Refrigeration, Air Conditioning and Heating (AIRAH) has released a series of fact sheets relating to the Australian Government’s new carbon-equivalent levy applied to hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant gases.

Under the Australian Government’s Clean Energy Future Plan, synthetic greenhouse gas (SGG) refrigerants attract an “equivalent carbon price” (also knows as the “carbon-equivalent levy”). 

AIRAH chief operating officer Neil Cox says the intent behind the five facts sheets is to assist the industry in its transition to a low-carbon future. The fact sheets are designed to be intelligible and informative to non-technical readers.

 

“Aimed at helping the HVAC&R industry accurately respond to the questions and concerns of clients or customers, the fact sheets cover the major changes associated with the HFC refrigerant levy,” Cox says.

 

“With some refrigerants now three to five times more expensive than previously, there are a number of new risks, considerations and opportunities for the industry to navigate following the introduction of the carbon-equivalent levy.”

The fact sheets cover a range of important topics, including how the levy is applied, managing financial risks, alternative refrigerants, and safety and energy-saving strategies.

Federally funded by the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), the fact sheets are available online. They may be printed, reprinted and distributed.

To access the fact sheets, go to the Resources - HFC Refrigerant Levy page.

 

The fact sheets cover five main topics:

  • The Clean Energy Future Plan and HFCs: Provides an outline of the HFC levy – why it was introduced, who pays it, which refrigerants attract the levy, and how much it will cost. It also looks at how system owners can minimise their exposure to the levy; options for new and existing HFC and HCFC systems; and general owner/operator issues to consider.
  • Energy-saving strategies – existing systems: Identifies the most energy-efficient low-GWP refrigerants and energy-saving options for existing systems, as well as how to reduce heat load and improve a system’s operating efficiency.
  • Opportunities in a low emission future: Explains investment incentives, energy cost-saving, green/sustainability credentials, new refrigerants, HFC system audits, energy-efficiency audits, leak detection and repair services, energy-efficiency interventions, refrigerant destruction, maintenance, green skills/credentials and identifying and addressing perverse outcomes.
  • Leak-prevention strategies: Covers the common causes of leaks, detection, costs involved, strategies to prevent leakage and how these might impact the capital costs of new systems.
  • Managing the financial and associated risks: Outlines the main risks for system owners and operators and technical service providers.

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Early bird registrations for Achieving the Green Dream conference to close soon (15/8/2012)

 

 

Tagged “Back to basics”, AIRAH’s Achieving the Green Dream conference is the third in the successful AIRAH series. The conference is about recognising the barriers to best-practice sustainable design, and leading industry towards a re-emphasis on getting the HVAC engineering basics right.

To be held in Sydney from September 11–12, the conference’s two-day program will feature speakers on a broad range of topics, covering issues such as:

  • Building optimisation
  • The role of government in achieving the green dream
  • Cogeneration and trigeneration: myths and facts
  • Modelled vs actual performance in Green Star-rated office buildings
  • User control in mixed-mode office buildings
  • Unlocking retrofit opportunities for Sydney’s buildings
  • Energy optimisation of commercial kitchen ventilation
  • Ultra-low-energy heating, cooling and ventilation.

 

“This is the most comprehensive program yet put together for an Achieving the Green Dream Conference,” says AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH.

“For anyone who has been seeking a technical conference focused on getting the fundamentals right, I strongly encourage you to get along to AIRAH’s Achieving the Green conference. It’s a can’t-miss event.”

Early bird registrations for AIRAH’s Achieving the Green Dream Conference close August 20. 

 
For more information and to register click here.

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AIRAH calls on building services engineers (6/8/2012)

 

AIRAH is seeking to have the occupation of “building services engineer” formally recognised by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

To this end, it is requesting that engineers who work within the HVAC industry take a few moments to complete an online survey.

AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH, says that as part of AIRAH's “closing the skills gap” strategic aim, the Institute is defining the skills and knowledge requirements of mechanical engineers working in the building services sector.

To date, AIRAH has interviewed members to examine their job roles, tasks, skills, knowledge and educational experiences. Three distinct roles have been identified: “graduate mechanical engineer”; “senior mechanical engineer”; and “principal engineer”.

“The definitions will be used to examine the feasibility of formally recognising ‘building services engineer’ as a discreet occupation, and detailing how the role of someone performing this task is defined,” Wilkinson says.

“We began by mapping out pathways throughout the industry – this is pretty well defined at trade level,” Wilkinson says.

“At engineering level it quickly became apparent that there is no hard-and-fast entry point to the building services and refrigeration industry. Indeed, there is no occupation recognition with the Australian Bureau of Statistics for ‘building services engineers’, even though many individuals define their role as working in this capacity. It’s high time we cleared this matter up.”

Wilkinson says “mechanical engineer” is a broad descriptive term that covers roles beyond the HVAC industry, whereas “mechanical building services engineer” more specifically refers to mechanical services such as air conditioning, heating and ventilation.

The survey is the first step to defining an agreed pathway through the industry. Step two will be an evidence-gathering exercise to show there are at least 300 individuals working in the occupation. Step three will be to then apply for ABS recognition.

Once the occupation has been officially defined, work will begin on a similar process to recognise “refrigeration engineering”.

“We would appreciate 10 minutes of respondents’ time to give us feedback on the outcomes of this research,” Wilkinson says. “Please note that personal details will be treated in full confidence.”

The survey, which is open until August 31, is online at: http://tiny.cc/1dfmhw

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AIRAH Awards 2012 – It's not too late to nominate (30/7/2012)

 

It’s not too late to nominate for the HVAC&R industry’s most prestigious awards: the AIRAH Awards 2012. Entries for the awards must be submitted by September 14.

AIRAH chief operating officer Neil Cox says that the nomination process for the AIRAH Awards has been revised and restructured so that it’s simpler and more streamlined, and with the language modernised.

“The AIRAH Awards 2012 have benefitted from some changes to better reflect what AIRAH, and our industry, is all about,” Cox says. “And the really good news is that the nomination process has been radically simplified.”

The AIRAH Awards 2012 are open to individuals, companies, corporate bodies, institutions and government authorities, and recognise work carried out during 2011. Awards will be presented at a lavish Awards Presentation Dinner to be held November 8 in Brisbane.

AIRAH board director Bryon Price, M.AIRAH, who oversaw the awards revamp, says industry recognition such as the AIRAH Awards represents the heartland of a professional society, reflecting its values and objectives.

“It became apparent that the award categories needed a tidy-up to ensure they recognised the attributes and qualities AIRAH represents,” Price says. “What you seek to reward is what you consider important. And it made sense both to make our awards more user-friendly, and to lower the barriers to entry.”

The changes have eliminated confusion caused by overlapping categories, ensuring that the aspects deserving recognition were covered, and aligned the awards with AIRAH’s objectives as an organisation.
Organisers also made a point of ensuring the awards complement the ARBS Awards (held earlier this year), and that together they comprise a rational set of plaudits.

Nomination forms have been scrutinised as well, with some of the more arduous, overly prescriptive or narrow criteria and questions trimmed. The outcome is more straightforward nomination criteria, conditions of entry and information requirements – making it easier to nominate those who deserve recognition. 

“We hope that the improved clarity around the awards categories and the revised nomination requirements will result in increased interest in the awards and improved levels of nomination,” Price says.
The result of this careful consideration is a reconstructed set of categories, including a new award category for research, the AIRAH Award for Excellence in HVAC&R Research. 

Awards open for nomination are the:

  • James Harrison Medal, the highest honour AIRAH can bestow upon an individual;
  • Future Leader award, recognising emerging leaders in any facet of the HVAC&R industry;
  • Student of the Year award, recognises outstanding scholarship at any level in the HVAC&R industry;
  • Best HVAC&R Retrofit or Upgrade award, recognising excellence in the retrofit or upgrade of an HVAC&R system, and can address the complete delivery of projects;
  • Denis Joseph Award for Innovative Use of Solar Energy in HVAC&R, recognising Australian initiatives that through the innovative use of solar energy significantly improve the performance of HVAC&R systems;
  • Excellence in Sustainability award, which recognises Australian initiatives that have made clear improvements in the sustainability of HVAC&R systems or the HVAC&R industry;
  • Excellence in Innovation award, which recognises substantial Australian improvements in the areas of HVAC&R achieved through innovation. This can include new or significantly enhanced products; or new or significantly improved systems, plant and equipment, or processes;
  • Excellence in HVAC&R Research, which recognises outstanding achievements in Australian research, leading to potential future improvements in these technologies; and the
  • W.R. Ahern award, which is awarded annually and recognises the best technical paper by an AIRAH member published in Ecolibrium in the preceding year. Nominations are not required in this category.

AIRAH Awards key dates

June 13: Nominations open
September 14: Entries close
November 8: Awards presentation dinner


2012 AIRAH Awards Presentation Dinner

What:  AIRAH Awards Presentation Dinner 2012
When: 7pm, Thursday, November 8, 2012
Where: The Strand at Rugby Quay, Brisbane
Cost: $160, tables of 10: $1,500

For more information and nomination forms click here.

To book a table email martine@airah.org.au

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AIRAH releases HVAC&R equipment global warming impact guide (20/07/2012)

 

The Australian Institute of Refrigeration, Air Conditioning and Heating (AIRAH) has released a handy Methods of Calculating Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) 2012 best-practice guide.

 

The guide, which is available free online, allows users to calculate the potential global warming impact of new, stationary HVAC&R systems at the design stage. This can help facility operators, system designers and industry practitioners make informed decisions, allowing them to compare the environmental impacts of different technical options.

 

AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH, says the free TEWI guide allows users to calculate, as its name implies, the overall environmental impact of an HVAC&R system: the indirect impact of the energy required to operate it, as well as the direct impact related to refrigerant loss, or “fugitive emissions”.

 

“The beauty of AIRAH’s TEWI guide is that it provides an accurate indication of the overall picture of an HVAC&R system’s environmental impact,” Wilkinson says.

 

“Understanding and controlling greenhouse gases requires ongoing, careful consideration and evaluation of energy consumption. The TEWI guide takes into account that the largest impact of global warming from stationary HVAC&R systems is through the generation of electricity to power the plant.”

In short, the TEWI guide calculates a whole-of-life measure of a system’s global warming impact.

Refrigerant released during the lifetime of the equipment, including unrecovered losses on final disposal, is added to the impact of CO2 emissions from the fossil fuels used to generate energy to operate the equipment throughout its life.

The Methods of Calculating Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) 2012 best-practice guide received funding from Refrigerants Australia. AIRAH’s Natural Refrigerants Special Technical Group had considerable involvement.

The guide is available on the AIRAH Resources page.

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Attention refrigeration system owners and operators: AIRAH to host free carbon-equivalent levy seminars (9/7/2012)

 

The Australian Institute of Refrigeration, Air Conditioning and Heating (AIRAH) is hosting a national series of FREE seminars explaining the impact of the carbon-equivalent levy on refrigerants. The levy, which came into effect July 1, will potentially impact anyone who owns or operates a refrigeration system.

AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH, says one of the little-publicised effects of the Australian Government’s Clean Energy Future legislative package introduced on July 1, is the carbon-equivalent levy imposed on a range of refrigerant gases based on their global warming potential (or GWP).

He says the carbon-equivalent levy’s price impact at the point of import varies across the main refrigerant gases, ranging between 300 and 500 per cent. 

Businesses such as cafe owners, coffee shops, supermarkets, pubs and restaurants are typical of those that could be affected by the carbon-equivalent levy. Other types of business affected include industrial firms, such as printing; agricultural, such as diary; cold chain, such as cold stores; medical, such as x-ray systems; and building owners.

 “Any shop that has a refrigeration cabinet could potentially be impacted depending on what type of gas it uses, and how often it’s serviced by a contractor,” Wilkinson says.

A typical scenario before the imposition of the levy would see owners of small businesses opt to “top up” leaking refrigerant in their system rather than locate and fix the source of the leak, or even more expensively, invest in a new system. Yet now, because of the levy imposed on high-GWP refrigerants – typically hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) – the price of that top-up has risen considerably.

“The price shock caused by the levy will accelerate migration to alternative technology, and to lower global-warming-potential gases – both good things,” Wilkinson says. 

“Yet there are many small businesses unsure of how the carbon-equivalent levy will affect them in the short term. Basically, if you supply, install, use, own or maintain refrigeration systems, you’re going to be affected by the carbon-equivalent levy, if you haven’t been already. There are already instances of some refrigerants being unavailable because they are being stockpiled.”

AIRAH’s seminars will explore how to reduce energy consumption and refrigerant costs. Topics include the carbon-equivalent levy and HFCs, managing financial risk associated with the levy, minimising refrigerant leaks, methods for implementing energy savings, and information on low-GWP refrigerants and their application.

At the seminars, real-world scenarios will be used to demonstrate how changes can be made. The format will see seminars hosted by an expert consultant, followed by a Q&A session.

The FREE seminars will take place in Perth July 30; Adelaide on July 31; Melbourne on August 1; Sydney on August 2; and Brisbane on August 3.

Places at the seminars are limited and must be secured by registering beforehand. Registration forms can be downloaded from the AIRAH seminars website.

 

 

 

 

AIRAH revamps awards in time for AIRAH Awards 2012 nominations (27/6/2012)

 

 

Nominations have opened for the AIRAH Awards 2012.

 

AIRAH chief operating officer Neil Cox says that the nomination process for the prestigious AIRAH Awards has been revised and restructured so that it’s simpler and more streamlined, and with the language modernised.

 

“The AIRAH Awards 2012 have benefitted from some changes to better reflect what AIRAH, and our industry is all about,” Cox says. “And the really good news is that the nomination process has been radically simplified.”

 

The AIRAH Awards 2012 are open to individuals, companies, corporate bodies, institutions and government authorities, and recognise work carried out during 2011. Awards will be presented at a lavish Awards Presentation Dinner to be held November 8 in Brisbane.

 

AIRAH board director Bryon Price, M.AIRAH, who oversaw the awards revamp, says industry recognition such as the AIRAH Awards represents the heartland of a professional society, reflecting its values and objectives.

 

“It became apparent that the award categories needed a tidy-up to ensure they recognised the attributes and qualities AIRAH represents,” Price says. “What you seek to reward is what you consider important. And it made sense both to make our awards more user-friendly, and to lower the barriers to entry.”

 

The changes have eliminated confusion caused by overlapping categories, ensuring that the aspects deserving recognition were covered, and aligned the awards with AIRAH’s objectives as an organisation.

 

Organisers also made a point of ensuring the awards complement the ARBS Awards (held earlier this year), and that together they comprise a rational set of plaudits.

 

Nomination forms have been scrutinised as well, with some of the more arduous, overly prescriptive or narrow criteria and questions trimmed. The outcome is more straightforward nomination criteria, conditions of entry and information requirements – making it easier to nominate those who deserve recognition. 

 

“We hope that the improved clarity around the awards categories and the revised nomination requirements will result in increased interest in the awards and improved levels of nomination,” Price says.

 

The result of this careful consideration is a reconstructed set of categories, including a new award category for research, the AIRAH Award for Excellence in HVAC&R Research. 

 

Awards open for nomination are the:

  • James Harrison Medal, the highest honour AIRAH can bestow upon an individual;
  • Future Leader award, recognising emerging leaders in any facet of the HVAC&R industry;
  • Student of the Year award, recognises outstanding scholarship at any level in the HVAC&R industry;
  • Best HVAC&R Retrofit or Upgrade award, recognising excellence in the retrofit or upgrade of an HVAC&R system, and can address the complete delivery of projects;
  • Denis Joseph Award for Innovative Use of Solar Energy in HVAC&R, recognising Australian initiatives that through the innovative use of solar energy significantly improve the performance of HVAC&R systems;
  • Excellence in Sustainability award, which recognises Australian initiatives that have made clear improvements in the sustainability of HVAC&R systems or the HVAC&R industry;
  • Excellence in Innovation award, which recognises substantial Australian improvements in the areas of HVAC&R achieved through innovation. This can include new or significantly enhanced products; or new or significantly improved systems, plant and equipment, or processes;
  • Excellence in HVAC&R Research, which recognises outstanding achievements in Australian research, leading to potential future improvements in these technologies; and the
  • W.R. Ahern award, which is awarded annually and recognises the best technical paper by an AIRAH member published in Ecolibrium in the preceding year. Nominations are not required in this category.

 

AIRAH Awards key dates

June 13: Nominations open
July 30: Intention to nominate closing date
September 14: Entries close
November 8: Awards presentation dinner


2012 AIRAH Awards Presentation Dinner
What:  AIRAH Awards Presentation Dinner 2012
When: 7pm, Thursday, November 8, 2012
Where: The Strand at Rugby Quay, Brisbane
Cost: $160, tables of 10: $1,500

 

For more information and nomination forms go to the AIRAH Awards 2012 page

 

To book a table email martine@airah.org.au

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AIRAH's Melbourne Pre-loved Buildings conference calls for abstracts (22/6/2012)

 

 

The latest in the series of AIRAH Pre-loved Buildings conferences will be held in Melbourne, from November 19-20.

AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH, says that updating the existing building stock in Australia is as important as the focus on new buildings. 

 

“All the major cities in Australia have something in common: they see a cleaner, greener, more productive future,” Wilkinson says. “Yet most of the buildings that make up these cities already exist. How will today’s buildings meet tomorrow’s needs? And how can we optimise their performance? These issues will be explored at the Pre-loved Buildings Conference.”

 

The Melbourne 2012 Pre-loved Buildings Conference, tagged “Preparing buildings for the future”, is the sixth in a series of highly successful AIRAH conferences, with previous iterations also held in Sydney, Brisbane and Perth, as well as the Victorian capital. 

 

Abstracts are welcome on a range of topics related to upgrading existing buildings, including but not limited to: barriers to upgrades; retrofitting lower-grade buildings; building refurbishment and tune-ups; retrocommissioning; BIM and pre-loved buildings; accessing funding; building maintenance; lifecycle analysis; the impact of the carbon tax; indoor environment quality and tenant perspectives; university building performance; embodied energy; and Green Star and NABERS performance.

 

Anyone interested in optimising the performance of existing building is welcome to register for the conference, but those who would most benefit are design engineers and consultants; mechanical services contractors; building owners and operators; facility managers; equipment suppliers; service personnel and installers; systems designers; and government personnel.

 

Conference committee chair Bruce Precious, M.AIRAH, says it is important existing buildings are ready for a rapidly changing regulatory and physical landscape.

 

 

“The future is just a second away and it promises to challenge the way we work, the way we live, the way we think,” Precious says. “The built environment as we’ve made it – schools, homes, shopping centres and office buildings – will endure. Buildings are a big investment, in dollars, in materials, in supporting infrastructure. 

 

“Making best use of what we’ve got, in a future where energy and water must come from new sources, buildings must meet new expectations in efficiency and effectiveness. This demands all of us put our minds to solving the sustainability puzzle: doing more with less. Resources are finite, creativity is infinite.”

 

Abstracts are due August 17. For more information about the Melbourne 2012 Pre-loved Buildings Conference, email kristy@airah.org.au or go to the Pre-loved Buildings 2012 conference page.

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AIRAH and Standards Australia to host seminars for AS 1668.2 and 1668.4 (8/06/2012)

 

 

AIRAH and Standards Australia are jointly hosting seminars in Melbourne and Sydney later this month, offering the chance for attendees to help shape AS 1668.2 and AS1668.4.

 

A revision of 1668.2 has separated the standard into two parts: AS1668.2 Mechanical Ventilation of Buildings; and AS1668.4 A New Performance Based Standard for Natural Ventilation of Buildings.

 

The Standards committees have drafted the new versions of the standards in anticipation of these being adopted into the National Construction Code.

 

Presenting the seminars, which will be held in Melbourne on June 20 and Sydney on June 21, will be Ross Warner, M.AIRAH, chair of Committee ME-062 (Ventilation and Air Conditioning), and David Shreeve, M.AIRAH, who chairs Sub-Committee ME-062-02 (Ventilation).

 

AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH, says the seminars are part of the process for eliciting public comment on the changes to the new standards.

 

“Hosted by AIRAH and Standards Australia, the seminars are a great chance to discuss the substantial changes to these important documents,” Wilkinson says.

 

“I strongly encourage anyone who has a comment or question to come along to the seminars, and then join Ross and David afterwards for a beer and pie.”

 

The seminars cost $59 for AIRAH members and $69 for non-members.

 

 

For more information about the seminars or to register click here

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AIRAH sends communiqué to Government concerning carbon-equivalent levy (15/5/2012)

 

AIRAH has sent a communiqué to the Australian Government canvassing concerns about the quickly approaching carbon-equivalent levy on refrigerants.


AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH, says the heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R) industry is deeply concerned about the unintended consequences of the carbon-equivalent levy, which will be introduced as part of the Australian Government’s Clean Energy Future legislative package on July 1.


“The carbon-equivalent levy on refrigerant gases is expected to have a considerable impact on the HVAC&R industry and the many businesses it serves and supports,” Wilkinson says. “Our communiqué to government outlines the issues and proposes urgent actions to avoid unwanted impacts from the legislative package’s introduction.”


Wilkinson says the points raised in the communiqué concern dramatically inflated refrigerant prices, safety, compliance, the substantial impact on small business, and continuing issues around training, standards and regulatory barriers.


He says the carbon-equivalent levy’s price impact at the point of import will vary across the main refrigerant gases, ranging between 300 and 500 per cent.


“Any industry that was forced to absorb an overnight price increase greater than 300 per cent would be severely strained,” Wilkinson says. “The rapid inflation in refrigerant gas values, without any immediate change in supply or demand, will create strong incentives for avoiding the levy, and encourage the formation of a refrigerant black market. This will cause increased compliance costs, reduced collection of the levy, unsafe practices and flouting of the law.


“At the same time, the price shock caused by the levy will accelerate migration to alternative technology, and to lower global-warming-potential gases – both good things. Yet without adequate awareness of the issue through education and training, the HVAC&R industry faces workplace heath and safety issues. And the levy will undoubtedly hurt small business and the economy in already difficult times.”


In March AIRAH organised the AIRAH Industry Summit 2012, bringing together 30 key stakeholders and representatives from government and industry organisations to discuss implications arising from the carbon tax and the levy. The communiqué was distilled from the summit’s conversations. An industry roadmap charting the way forward for industry is also in the works.


The communiqué calls for government to form an Interdepartmental Committee that has representatives from government and industry; to provide funding in support of awareness- raising with industry via forums and other communication tools; and to allocate seed funding to extend the federally regulated refrigerant handling scheme to include all refrigerants.


The HVAC&R industry is at the forefront of improving the energy efficiency of its equipment, which has been estimated to use as much as 20 per cent of Australia’s distributed energy, and be responsible for 7 per cent of its annual greenhouse gas emissions.


“The carbon-equivalent levy on refrigerants is estimated to raise approximately $300 million per annum,” Wilkinson says. “As an industry we are seeking a fair allocation of funds raised to be re-invested in the future of a most essential industry.”


The communiqué is available at the Useful Documents page

 

The communiqué has been sent to the Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency; Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education; the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities; the Department of Resources, Energy and Tourism; and the Department of Employment and Workplace Relations, Financial Services and Superannuation.

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AIRAH’S Achieving the Green Dream conference calls for abstracts (3/5/2012)

 

AIRAH is calling for abstracts for the Achieving the Green Dream conference to be held in Sydney from September 11-12.


Tagged “Back to basics”, the conference is the third in the successful series, with the inaugural conference held in Brisbane in July 2009, and the Melbourne version in
September 2010.


AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH, says while there has in recent times been an emphasis on implementing new technologies into high-performing buildings, the industry requires its professionals to understand the basics and to get them right.


“The driving force behind the 2012 Achieving the Green Dream conference is what AIRAH sees as a pressing need to recognise the HVAC&R engineering design fundamentals, and to execute them correctly,” Wilkinson says.
 

“At the moment, the basics are not always being done well, or even properly understood. There are many reasons for this – skills shortages, a lack of training, systemic poor habits, shortcuts taken under cost and time pressures, and some professionals attempting to run before they can walk, so to speak.”


Conference committee chair Nathan Groenhout, M.AIRAH, says that tagged with a theme of “Back to basics”, AIRAH’s 2012 Achieving the Green conference is all about recognising the barriers to best-practice sustainable design, and leading industry towards a re-emphasis on getting the HVAC engineering basics right.


AIRAH is calling for 200-300 word abstracts. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Design pitfalls, solutions and options
  • Technology implementation and practices – lessons and challenges
  • Real-world practices, behaviours and costs
  • The fundamentals explained
  • Translating design into construction and installation
  • Installation – commercial impacts, challenges and success stories
  • Air tightness of buildings
  • Facades
  • The changing regulatory environment
  • Section J compliance and BCA issues
  • Energy modelling
  • RICS and cost estimating

 

“From my own experience, making systems and controls more complex increases the chances of failure or sub-par performance,” Groenhout says. “There is certain elegance in simplicity that leads to improved maintainability, greater resilience and generally energy-efficient outcomes.


“I would encourage those who can tell a positive story about the practical knowledge they’ve acquired or lessons they’ve learnt to submit an abstract.”

Case studies, particularly relating to built and operational projects, are encouraged.


Those submitting abstracts should note that Achieving the Green Dream – Back to basics is a building services engineering conference focusing on HVAC and mechanical engineering.


All submissions must be accompanied by a 50-100 word author bio.


Abstracts should be sent to AIRAH conference organiser Kristy Intamanon by June 8. Email: kristy@airah.org.au


For more information go to www.airah.org.au/greendream2012

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Don Cleland and Katie Volter to keynote at AIRAH's Refrigeration 2012 conference (1/05/2012)

 

Professor Don Cleland from New Zealand’s Massey University and Katie Volter from the Australian Government Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC) have been named as keynote speakers for the coming AIRAH conference, Refrigeration 2012 – adapting to a low carbon reality. The conference is slated for Brisbane on July 24.
 

Cleland is head of the school of Engineering and Advanced Technology at Massey University in New Zealand. At the conference he will discuss the increasing complexity of choosing refrigerants.
 

Volter, who is an assistant director with DSEWPaC, will discuss the implementation of the government’s plan for an equivalent carbon price for synthetic greenhouse gases used in the HVAC&R industry.


AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH, says that securing the services of Professor Cleland, an Honourary AIRAH Member, and Volter, a government insider, is quite the coup for the conference committee.


“Professor Cleland is a distinguished and accomplished educator and researcher,” Wilkinson says. “Having him deliver the keynote address for Refrigeration 2012 – adapting to a low carbon reality will be fantastic way to kick off the conference.


“And since the HVAC&R industry is poised at such an important juncture right now, it’s great that Katie Volter is available to talk about the government’s carbon-equivalent levy.”


Cleland’s presentation at Refrigeration 2012 – adapting to a low carbon reality will examine the constraints that affect choosing refrigerants for large and small-scale applications, and identify options for the future for both new and retrofit applications.


Cleland believes any analysis of refrigerants should not be dominated by economics. According to his paper “Refrigerants – Back to the Future?” there are three main concerns when choosing refrigerants: environmental impact, safety, and the technical and economic constraints (cost, performance and availability).


Cleland’s research interests include industrial refrigeration, energy efficiency and food processing.


He is an honourary member of the International Institute of Refrigeration (IIR) and a fellow of ASHRAE, the Institution of Professional Engineers of NZ, the Institute of Refrigerating, Heating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (IRHACE) of NZ, and the NZ Institute of Food Science and Technology.


Volter, who has a PhD in chemistry, has been involved with DSEWPaC’s Ozone and Synthetic Gas team for three years. She has considerable experience working in government policy and technical roles, and as a consultant.


Wilkinson says Refrigeration 2012 – adapting to our low carbon reality is a logical follow-up to AIRAH’s enormously popular and successful refrigeration conference held in Melbourne last year.


“Given that we are on the eve of the implementation of the carbon tax and levy, we feel now is an appropriate time for AIRAH to host the second refrigeration conference,” he says.


“Refrigeration 2012 – adapting to our low carbon reality will deal with refrigeration issues in the age of the carbon tax. The cost impact to refrigerants, the skills shortage and the latest technical developments all need to be discussed in detail.”


For more information or to register, go to www.airah.org.au/refrigeration2012

 

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AIRAH Welcomes new personnel to its head office (30/3/2012)

 

Several staff changes have recently taken place at AIRAH head office in Melbourne, with one employee stepping in to a recently created role, and two new staff members joining the team.


Recruits Kristy Intamanon and Rachel Urquhart started at AIRAH headquarters earlier this month. After originally working for AIRAH on the Building Simulation 2011 (BS2011) conference Georgina Johnston has moved into the role of membership manager.


“I take great delight in welcoming Kristy and Rachel to AIRAH, and Georgina to the role of membership manager,” says AIRAH chief operating officer Neil Cox.


“I have no doubt that they are all perfectly suited to their respective roles, and will bring innovation, professionalism and energy to the organisation.”


Georgina had a stint working for AIRAH in 2008, returning to the Institute late last year to help out in an organisational role on BS2011.

“AIRAH is a great organisation to work for,” Georgina says. “While it may be a small team of staff behind the scenes, they really are a team."

“I will be acting in the capacity of executive officer for the Victorian, South Australian and Tasmanian divisions, as well as looking after the membership database and growing AIRAH’s membership base."

“I’ve found our members to be very excited about the industry and enthusiastic about getting involved with AIRAH. I enjoy working with people who are passionate about what they do, as it gives you a new perspective on things.”


Kristy Intamanon is AIRAH’s new conference manager; she will be responsible for organising AIRAH’s national conferences each year, including this year’s Refrigeration 2012 in Brisbane, Achieving the Green Dream in Sydney and the Pre-loved Buildings Conference in Melbourne.

Originally from Melbourne, Kristy arrived at AIRAH from Standards Australia in Sydney, where she worked as a team coordinator.

“I am looking forward to organising informative and successful conferences,” Kristy says. “AIRAH has a great reputation in the industry, and I’m proud and excited to be working for what is an exciting time for AIRAH.”


Rachel Urquhart is the newest addition to the publishing team that produces HVAC&R Nation and Ecolibrium.

Rachel recently arrived in Melbourne from northern New South Wales, where she worked as a journalist for Rural Press’s Nambucca Guardian News.

“I’m proud to be working for an organisation that is so well respected within the industry,” Rachel says. “Also, it’s exciting to be working on publications that are going from strength to strength and standing out as the leading industry magazines.

“I’m looking forward to learning more about the industry and the people involved, working with AIRAH’s great publishing team and contributing to future issues of HVAC&R Nation and Ecolibrium."

Click here to read the article from the April issue of Ecolibrium.

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AIRAH Industry Summit 2012 to lead transition to a low-carbon HVAC&R future (23/3/2012)

 

Next Thursday March 29 the AIRAH Industry Summit 2012 will bring together key industry stakeholders, decision makers and influential member organisations to determine a roadmap for the HVAC&R industry’s transition to a low-carbon future.


AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH, says that there is considerable confusion about what the impacts of the imminent carbon tax will be for the industry. The AIRAH Industry Summit, he says, will be a key stage in developing a plan for a low-carbon future.


“The AIRAH Industry Summit 2012 is all about gathering input from those in a best position to provide it,” Wilkinson says. “Our focus is about capturing expert knowledge and opinion from the industry’s leaders, rather than as an end in itself.

“We will then synthesise the results into a constructive blueprint for the transition to a low-carbon HVAC&R industry.”


Those in attendance at the Summit will include industry organisations such as AMCA, AREMA, the Plumbing Industry Commission, the ARC, as well as state and federal government departments and regulators. 

Issues to be canvassed on the day will cover regulatory, licensing, skills capacity and shortages, training, technology advancement, refrigerant costs, standards and codes.

“It’s all about harnessing industry input and getting engagement,” says AIRAH board director Bryon Price, M.AIRAH, who is strategic development director for the A.G. Coombs Group. “The AIRAH Industry Summit 2012 will be an exercise in coalescing ideas and forging a blueprint for change.”

AIRAH president Sean Treweek, M.AIRAH, a principal at WSP Asia Pacific, says the event will engage the broader industry, drawing out the pivotal issues and concerns.

“The industry is poised at a critical juncture,” Treweek says. “In bringing representatives from the broader HVAC&R sphere together, AIRAH is facilitating an essential information-gathering process that will deliver a clear and practical path forward. It is essential that we work together as an industry to meet this challenge.”

 

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AIRAH review calls for more streamlined and robust NABERS system (9/3/2012)

 

 

AIRAH has release a comprehensive and wide-ranging survey and technical review of the NABERS sustainability rating scheme.


The Institute facilitated the survey and review on behalf of the NABERS stakeholder advisory committee. It collates all comments made, including specific issues industry practitioners have raised with the NABERS tools, and offers solutions.


More than 100 survey respondents contributed to the report, which highlights strategic, technical and administrative priority issues for consideration during the NABERS strategic review.
AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson, M.AIRAH, says a theme of the results is firm support for the system but also the requirement for a more streamlined, robust approach.


“The survey has really highlighted how well accepted and embraced the NABERS rating tools are, and that industry really wants clarity to be actively engaged in improving the suite of tools,” Wilkinson says.


Comments from the survey were overwhelmingly positive and constructive.


They included, “NABERS?  I love it!”


One respondent described NABERS as an “excellent system”, but said there needs to be a focus on keeping it streamlined.


“All in all NABERS is a very useful rating tool,” another respondent said. “NABERS provides a credible result that is clear and comparable. A few minor changes would help improve energy efficiencies within buildings.”


Wilkinson says there should be awareness that there was an element of “work in progress” with the NABERS rating tool, and that cooperation among the various stakeholders was critical for it to be improved further.


“A lot of technical issues have been raised, and we as industry need to be realistic about how quickly the items can be dealt with,” Wilkinson says.


Issues identified as priority areas of attention include methods to determine hours of occupancy; building, space and activity classification; the use and calibration of meters and sub-meters; the treatment of data rooms in the tools; and the methods specified for microbiological sampling and testing of indoor air.


The NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, which manages NABERS, said it was pleased with the feedback.


“We are working through the findings in detail to ensure that NABERS remains a robust and reliable system and continues to be held in high regard by industry,” says Matthew Clark, director water and energy programs, Office of Environment and Heritage.


To access the report go to www.airah.org.au/Useful_documents

 

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AIRAH Refrigeration 2012 - An AIRAH conference calls for abstracts (1/2/2012)

 

  

In Brisbane on July 24 AIRAH is holding a conference dedicated to refrigeration, Refrigeration 2012 – An AIRAH conference: adapting to our low carbon reality. Abstracts are now welcome.

AIRAH CEO Phil Wilkinson says the conference is a logical follow-up to the first Refrigeration conference, which was held last year in Melbourne and proved to be enormously popular and successful.

“Given that we are on the eve of the implementation of the carbon tax, we feel now is an appropriate time for AIRAH to host the second Refrigeration conference,” Wilkinson says.

“Refrigeration 2012 – adapting to our low carbon reality will deal with refrigeration issues in the age of the carbon tax. The cost impact to refrigerants, the skills shortage and the latest technical developments all need to be discussed in detail.”

     
 

 

  

AIRAH is calling for 300-400 word abstracts. Topics and case studies may include, but are not limited to:

  • Regulation, Australian Standards and policy initiatives
  • Trends in International Standards
  • Domestic air conditioning – split systems
  • Domestic hot water systems – heat pump (natural and synthetic refrigerant)
  • General commercial refrigeration
  • Safety in refrigeration
  • Montreal Protocol as a vehicle for HFC phase-out – latest international developments
  • Latest in energy-efficiency/carbon-reduction technology and practices
  • Controls strategies
  • Lessons learned from carbon taxes internationally
  • Refrigeration and risk management
  • End-user perspectives
  • Issues for small, medium  and large-scale contractors
  • Refrigeration into the future – how to prepare for change
  • Addressing the skills shortage
  • Maintenance, refrigerant leakage and automated monitoring
  • Liability issues for manufacturers, installers, end user/employers
  • Modelling system energy consumption
  • Industrial refrigeration systems for storage and process applications
  • High-temperature industrial heat pumps using natural refrigerants
  • Thermal storage.

 

Abstracts are due April 1. All submissions must be sent with a 50-100 word author bio and high-resolution author photo.


Who should submit an abstract?

  • Government: state, federal, and associated consultants
  • Commercial and industrial refrigeration
  • Energy conservation technologists
  • Food industry: entire food chain (storage, transport, processing, retail)
  • Beverage industry participants
  • Health industry: blood banks/hospitals/pharmaceuticals
  • Marine and mining industry representatives.

 

AIRAH members chosen to present at the conference will receive complimentary registration. Non-AIRAH members chosen to present at the conference will be entitled to a discounted conference registration fee.


For more information visit the Refrigeration 2012 - An AIRAH conference website.

 

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